Climate Change Audio

Most of the audio here came from Australia’s ABC. I am in absolute awe of these people. They are quite possibly the best national broadcaster in the world today. Additional audio came from Radio Ecoshock, hosted by Alex Smith and The Nevada Spectator.

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Short takes

Carbon dioxide emissions rising fast

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Last decade equals warmest on record: UN

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Climate change in the Pacific Ocean

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Climate change in the Indian Ocean

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Pacific Islands adapting to climate change

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The science

Observing effects of a changing climate

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How is a changing climate impacting on biodiversity and farming systems? TRENDS — The Transect for Environmental Monitoring and Decision Making — is gathering historical data to determine the changes. Flowers are changing their flowering times, such as orchids flowering 20 days earlier that they once did. In some places whole plant communities are changing their composition. The public can help track these changes.

The changing chemistry of ocean water

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Between a third and a half of carbon dioxide emissions end up in the ocean. Acidity is increasing. Patterns of circulation are changing and along with them, ocean chemistry. Areas of ocean are experiencing different temperature, salinity and mixes of nutrients. Tom Trull’s group at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies is monitoring and studying ocean chemistry to determine what might be expected as conditions change.

Big changes in carbon output being achieved

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The Smith School Enterprise and the Environment is advising the government of Rwanda on how to develop without carbon inputs, and therefore outputs! Indonesia, Brazil, South Africa and China are achieving major shifts in their carbon output.

Indonesia and Brazil are reducing the felling of native forests. And China is planting vast areas of desert with trees. China is also moving ahead quickly with production of wind farms and photovoltaics for electricity production.

How plants react to elevated carbon dioxide

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Carbon dioxide is expected to be 550 parts per million by mid-century. Mark Hovenden is investigating how this will affect plants. Plots of native grasslands are being exposed to an atmosphere with elevated levels of carbon dioxide.

Despite plants requiring carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, the higher concentrations alone do not stimulate greater growth. Growth is limited by nutrients and water. Any extra growth is small. Microbial activity also changes with higher carbon dioxide, reducing the quality of the leaf litter. Carbon accumulates as leaf litter and this locks up nutrients.

How insects respond to rising temperatures

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It is known that animals are moving polewards to escape rising temperatures. But if they reach a barrier, they can become trapped. What happens then? Nigel Andrew and his team are monitoring insects over environmental gradients measuring changes to morphology and physiology trying to determine how they react to short term temperature bursts and long term temperature changes.

Climate changes for Tasmania

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Many climate events once thought of as occurring once in a hundred years are being observed on average every ten years. Climate Futures for Tasmania, a project of the Tasmanian Government, brings together a range of climate models and provides climate predictions with local effects for small communities.

The Great Barrier Reef in the age of rapid climate change

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James Woodford asks how the Great Barrier Reef is responding to more ferocious cyclones and increasing water temperatures. Are we observing natural changes, or a slow lurch to disaster?

Southern Ocean Sentinel observes impacts of climate change

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Antarctica and the Southern Ocean exhibit clear impacts of climate change. Observing these physical changes far away from human influence is thought to be clear a indication of what’s actually happening as the Earth warms.

Andrew Constable describes what’s being seen following recent trips down south. He says monitoring and measuring changes will allow us to correctly respond to a changing world.

Enriching soil with biochar

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Adding charcoal to soil regularly over a long period has been shown to radically improve soil and its ability to support crops. Organic carbon in soils is lost as forests are replaced by crops. Gradually over time, the soils decline.

Adding biochar is a remedy. It’s a method that has been employed by some Aboriginal and South American cultures for centuries. In South America people created charcoal and added it to soil, deliberately, knowing that it enriched soil.

The NSW Department of Primary Industry is running biochar experiments in a range of locations. Jos Webber runs a coffee plantation on the north coast hinterland of NSW and shows Robyn Williams his biochar experimental plots. Some field trials show significant sequestration of carbon dioxide. Lukas Van Zwieten and Stephen Kimber describe changes in soil chemistry when biochar is added.

How changing climate affects biodiversity

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Hundreds of studies show all sorts of species are moving higher where they can or moving polewards, searching for relief from rising temperatures. And plants are flowering earlier.

It has been established that within the present century, plants and animals will face temperatures not experienced for a million years. Complex interactions between communities are poorly understood, so implications are difficult to predict. With a 3-4 degree increase in temperature, extinction rates are tipped to increase by 20%-30%. This raises questions about our management of natural systems.

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Climate change denial

An analysis of climate change denial

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Authors John Cook and Haydn Washington analyse the approaches of those who deny climate science. Despite multiple lines of evidence pointing to the same conclusion, deniers continue to deny. Cherry picking is one tactic. Another is the use of fake experts or scientists who are not climate scientists. The authors explore why, as the science firms, the public view, at least in Australia, is going the other way.

Naomi Oreskes – Merchants of Doubt

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Despite data being collected for over half a century, despite a President being warned about the looming threat of a changing climate in the mid 1960s, and despite plants and animals now changing their behaviour to fast altering conditions, a few scientists continue to raise doubts regarding climate science and its findings.

Naomi Oreskes sees a pattern. The pattern repeats itself in a string of issues including controversy over tobacco smoke, the dangers of acid rain, and DDT. Naomi Oreskes tells the story in her book Merchants of Doubt and today on The Science Show we hear Naomi Oreskes in a public address at the University of NSW in 2010.

The nasty side of Christopher Monckton

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The Scottish peer Lord Monckton has been raising hell against the carbon tax in barnstorming rallies and public meetings around the country. But just who is Lord Monckton and who are the forces behind him?

Chief amongst them is a mysterious group called the Galileo Movement, supported by shock-jock Alan Jones, and mining magnate and now media player Gina Rinehart. ABC Reporter Wendy Carlisle risks life and limb getting some of the facts.

The machinery of climate denial

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An investigation into climate science deniers by computer scientist Dr. John Mashey. Fake institutes, plagiarism, libel & lies to Congress stall awareness of climate danger — just like the doubt spread by “big tobacco”.

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People

Barry Jones: Climate change debate? Pity about the science…

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Barry Jones was Minister for Science in Bob Hawke’s government and is a Fellow of all four of Australia’s Learned Academies. Today he discusses the development and the debate of climate science over the years.

The climate prophet: A 2-part presentation from James Hansen (2006)

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“In 2006 I attended the 3rd annual California Climate Change Conference and recorded a speech given by noted NASA climate change scientist, Dr. James Hansen. In his talk he said he wanted to close the gap between what is known and what is understood about climate change. Looking back to 2006, it appears we are no closer to closing that gap in the minds of lawmakers who put corporate profits before global security and sustainability. The Republican position is an embarrassment.

“I post a recording from 2006 because everything Dr. Hansen said was going to happen is indeed happening by well documented degrees. Will the evidence for climate change be severe enough to soften concrete skulls in 2016 … 2021?”

The Nevada Spectator

Tim Flannery: reasons to be hopeful

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On the release of his book, Here on Earth an argument for hope, scientist and author Tim Flannery appears in a public forum at The Seymour Centre in Sydney. Tim Flannery attended the Copenhagen climate talks in Copenhagen in 2009 which were largely seen as a failure. Despite this, and most environmental indicators looking bad and getting worse, Flannery outlines the reasons he is hopeful for the future of life on planet Earth.

Paul Gilding: The Great Disruption

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According to Paul Gilding, former CEO of Greenpeace International, there will be a global economic crash in 2018. But the global population will mobilise. There will be a herculean effort, the likes of which have not been seen since World War 2.

Julian Huppert: Australia lagging on carbon initiatives

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In 2011, Julian Huppert is the only member of the UK House of Commons who has ever worked as a practising scientist, having worked as a research scientist studying the structures of DNA.

Julian Huppert compares the way ideas are developed and changed in science with what happens in politics. In science, people’s positions change. In politics, they rarely do.

Julian Huppert lists recent achievements and describes the compromises required in the world of politics. Julian Huppert says two people from the UK who have gained publicity regarding their views on climate science and policy on their recent visits to Australia are not highly regarded back home.

Christopher Monckton, says Huppert, is seen as eccentric and insignificant, while Nigel Lawson is considered on the extreme fringe. As carbon initiatives have been in place for some years in Europe and other areas, including China, Australia is seen as behind the pack and needs to catch up.

The storms of James Hansen

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A discussion with the prominent NASA climate scientist about his journey of scientific discovery, the gradual process by which he became convinced of the science of global warming, and how he believes scientists need to address current public doubt.

Ray Anderson – Climate Change hero

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Ray Anderson (1934-2011) was founder and chairman of Interface Inc., one of the world’s largest manufacturers of modular carpet for commercial and residential applications and a leading producer of commercial broadloom and commercial fabrics. He was “known in environmental circles for his advanced and progressive stance on industrial ecology and sustainability.” Anderson died on August 8, 2011 after a 20-month battle with cancer.

The nasty side of Christopher Monckton

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The Scottish peer Lord Monckton has been raising hell against the carbon tax in barnstorming rallies and public meetings around the country. But just who is Lord Monckton and who are the forces behind him?

Chief amongst them is a mysterious group called the Galileo Movement, supported by shock-jock Alan Jones, and mining magnate and now media player Gina Rinehart. ABC Reporter Wendy Carlisle risks life and limb getting some of the facts.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. on the evils of coal

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Extreme rainfall events continue. New tropical diseases come to America with global warming. Floods (again) in Pakistan. Dengue fever in America (what it is, what to do). Then the speech by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. to the Commonwealth Club of California. The evils of coal, a sustainable energy vision, and why corporations shun Progressive radio (while controlling mainstream news).

Tzeporah Berman, Daphne Wysham & Naomi Klein: Protesting the Canadian Tar Sands

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Interview with Tzeporah Berman, of Forest Ethics, now co-director of the Climate & Energy Campaign for Greenpeace. And, from Earthbeat radio reporter Daphne Wysham, Naomi Klein outside the White House — at Keystone XL Pipeline protest. Klein exposes conspiracy to export Tar Sands oil to Europe, using cloak of American patriotism. Plus, Indigenous Environment Network Director Tom Goldtooth and Tar Sands victims in Canada and the U.S.

Dr. Hans Joachim Schellnhuber: Climate – 4 degrees or more

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How hot can we get? Are we headed for climate disaster? Disturbing speech by one of the world’s most influential climate scientist, Dr. Hans Joachim “John” Schellnhuber of the Potsdam Institute. Keynote at “Four Degrees or More” Conference, Melbourne Australia, on July 12, 2011. New Science you must hear.

Joe Romm & David Wasdell: Beyond the tipping point

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New science, from MIT, the Hadley Centre and the Royal Society, warns that fossil fuel emissions will lead to runaway climate change. Energy expert and blogger Joe Romm of climateprogress.org explains. From UK, David Wasdell explains why we are headed “beyond the tipping point.” Music clip “Seeds of Our Past” by Dirtfella.

Jeff Masters & Joe Romm: Flood, fire, wind – Climate shift

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From the Weather Underground, meteorologist Jeff Masters explains killer tornadoes, record floods, and the Texas drought, with an eye to climate. Climate Progress blogger & energy expert Joe Romm discusses weather & climate, plus new science on “salt surges.” Canadian wild fire expert Mike Flannigan talks about Boreal and Tundra fires.

Bill McKibben – Last Stand for Climate

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Founder of 350.org and author of “Eaarth” gives update and advice in this fresh speech recorded at UBC in Vancouver, Canada, by Alex Smith. The recording covers selections from speech and some Q & A. The talk covers civil disobedience, the fossil lobby, organizing, action days and more. Q and A courtesy The Vancouver Institute.

Josh Willis & Alistair Hobday: The Age of Ocean Warming

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90% of global warming goes into the ocean. Heating seas change storms and destroy species now, and for 100s of years into the future. Dr. Josh Willis of NASA explains how. Dr. Alistair Hobday of CSIRO Australia talks about the impact on marine species. This is the biggest under-reported story of our times. Plus a sample from “The Climate Show” New Zealand.

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